President's page: antimicrobial prophylaxis to prevent infective endocarditis: why did the recommendations change?

Abstract

A final impetus for change was that the guidelines themselves had become more complicated with each revision, with ambiguous recommendations for which specific patient and which particular procedure required the prophylaxis. t has been more than 50 years since the American Heart Association (AHA) first made recommendations for the use of antimicrobial agents to prevent infective endocarditis (IE). The first AHA document on this subject was published in 1955 nd has been followed by 9 revisions outlining which patients, which procedures, and hat antibiotics should be used to prevent IE. Since that time, there have been extensive fforts by physicians, dentists, and patients to ensure that everyone at risk for developing ndocarditis would follow these guidelines and receive the proper regimen of antibiotics rior to selected dental or surgical procedures. However, in 2007 the AHA issued guidance for IE prophylaxis that greatly simplified he recommendations and proposed substantive changes—changes that would affect undreds of thousands of patients in the U.S. alone (1). Since then, we, and most likely ll of you, have been barraged by our surgical and dental colleagues and patients with nquiries—“Are you sure this is the right thing to do? Would you mind putting the recmmendation in writing before I proceed?”

DOI: 10.1016/j.jacc.2008.07.004

Cite this paper

@article{Weaver2008PresidentsPA, title={President's page: antimicrobial prophylaxis to prevent infective endocarditis: why did the recommendations change?}, author={W . Douglas Weaver and Rick Nishimura and Carole A . Warnes}, journal={Journal of the American College of Cardiology}, year={2008}, volume={52 6}, pages={495-7} }