Presence of a pet dog and human cardiovascular responses to mild mental stress

@article{Kingwell2006PresenceOA,
  title={Presence of a pet dog and human cardiovascular responses to mild mental stress},
  author={Bronwyn A. Kingwell and Andrea Lomdahl and Warwick P. Anderson},
  journal={Clinical Autonomic Research},
  year={2006},
  volume={11},
  pages={313-317}
}
The mechanisms underlying the possible cardiovascular benefits of pet ownership have not been established. Using a randomized design, the effect of a friendly dog on cardiovascular and autonomic responses to acute, mild mental stress was investigated. Seventy-two subjects (aged 40±14 y; mean±SD) participated. Rest was alternated with mental stress during four 10-minute periods. An unknown dog was randomly selected to be present during the first or the second half of the study. Blood pressure… Expand

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