Presence of Multiparasite Infections Within Individual Colonies of Leaf-Cutter Ants

@inproceedings{Taerum2010PresenceOM,
  title={Presence of Multiparasite Infections Within Individual Colonies of Leaf-Cutter Ants},
  author={Stephen J. Taerum and Matias Cafaro and Cameron R. Currie},
  booktitle={Environmental entomology},
  year={2010}
}
ABSTRACT Host—parasite dynamics can be altered when a host is infected by multiple parasite genotypes. The different strains of parasite are expected to compete for the limited host resources, potentially affecting the survival and reproduction of the host as well as the infecting parasites. Fungus-growing ants, including the well-known leaf-cutters, are an emerging model system for studying the evolution and ecology of symbiosis and host-parasite dynamics. We examine whether the fungus gardens… 
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