Prescription of Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs and Muscle Relaxants for Back Pain in the United States

@article{Luo2004PrescriptionON,
  title={Prescription of Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs and Muscle Relaxants for Back Pain in the United States},
  author={Xu-ri Luo and Ricardo Pietrobon and Lesley H. Curtis and Lloyd A. Hey},
  journal={Spine},
  year={2004},
  volume={29},
  pages={E531-E537}
}
Study Design. Secondary analysis of the 2000 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS). Objective. To examine national prescription patterns of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and muscle relaxants among individuals with back pain in the United States. Summary of Background Data. There is a lack of information on national prescription patterns of NSAIDs and muscle relaxants among individuals with back pain in the United States. Methods. Traditional NSAIDs, cyclooxygenase-2-specific… 
Evidence-informed management of chronic low back pain with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, muscle relaxants, and simple analgesics.
  • G. Malanga, E. Wolff
  • Medicine
    The spine journal : official journal of the North American Spine Society
  • 2008
TLDR
This special focus issue of The Spine Journal is sponsored by the North American Spine Society and aims to help understand and evaluate the various commonly used nonsurgical approaches to CLBP, with articles contributed by leading spine practitioners and researchers.
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TLDR
Adding baclofen, metaxalone, or tizanidine to ibuprofen does not appear to improve functioning or pain any more than placebo plus ib uprofen by 1 week after an ED visit for acute low back pain.
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TLDR
Systematic reviews and meta-analyses support using skeletal muscle relaxants for short-term relief of acute low back pain when nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or acetaminophen are not effective or tolerated.
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