Premedication of the pediatric patient – anesthesia for the uncooperative child

@article{Bozkurt2007PremedicationOT,
  title={Premedication of the pediatric patient – anesthesia for the uncooperative child},
  author={Pervin Sutaş Bozkurt},
  journal={Current Opinion in Anaesthesiology},
  year={2007},
  volume={20},
  pages={211–215}
}
  • P. Bozkurt
  • Published 1 June 2007
  • Medicine
  • Current Opinion in Anaesthesiology
Purpose of review Inadequate handling of an uncooperative child preoperatively results in postoperative behavior problems. Premedication enables a calm induction and helps to decrease postoperative problems. Several premedicants will be covered in this review. Recent findings Questions raised about the effects of oral midazolam use in children for premedication are now finding answers. New agents (dexmedetomidine and atypical antipsychotic agents) can be alternatives in premedication… 
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©International Anesthesia Research Society. Unauthorized Use Prohibited. Learning Objectives: I. Are parents useful (in the operating room)? a. To discuss the developmental differences in child
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