Preliminary observations on the birth and development ofPropithecus verreauxi to the age of six months

@article{Richard2006PreliminaryOO,
  title={Preliminary observations on the birth and development ofPropithecus verreauxi to the age of six months},
  author={Alison F. Richard},
  journal={Primates},
  year={2006},
  volume={17},
  pages={357-366}
}
  • A. Richard
  • Published 1 July 1976
  • Environmental Science
  • Primates
In this paper, preliminary observations are presented on the ontogency of one of the Malagasy prosimians,Propithecus verreauxi. Observations were carried out in the course of an eighteen-month study of the social organization and ecology of four, free-ranging groups. Parturition is described, together with data on the development of locomotor and feeding behavior, and on the changing nature of the infant's relationship with its mother and with other members of the group. The final section… 

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References

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Intra-specific variation in the social organization and ecology of Propithecus verreauxi.

  • A. Richard
  • Economics
    Folia primatologica; international journal of primatology
  • 1974
This paper presents information collected during an 18-month study of four groups of Propithecus verreauxi living in the north-west and south of Madagascar. Various aspects of the s