Prediction of gene–phenotype associations in humans, mice, and plants using phenologs

@inproceedings{Woods2012PredictionOG,
  title={Prediction of gene–phenotype associations in humans, mice, and plants using phenologs},
  author={John O. Woods and Ulf Martin Singh-Blom and Jon M. Laurent and Kriston L. McGary and Edward M. Marcotte},
  booktitle={BMC Bioinformatics},
  year={2012}
}
Phenotypes and diseases may be related to seemingly dissimilar phenotypes in other species by means of the orthology of underlying genes. Such “orthologous phenotypes,” or “phenologs,” are examples of deep homology, and may be used to predict additional candidate disease genes. In this work, we develop an unsupervised algorithm for ranking phenolog-based candidate disease genes through the integration of predictions from the k nearest neighbor phenologs, comparing classifiers and weighting… CONTINUE READING
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