Predicting the outcome of anomia therapy for people with aphasia post CVA: Both language and cognitive status are key predictors

@article{LambonRalph2010PredictingTO,
  title={Predicting the outcome of anomia therapy for people with aphasia post CVA: Both language and cognitive status are key predictors},
  author={Matthew. A. Lambon Ralph and Claerwen Snell and Joanne Fillingham and Paul Conroy and Karen Sage},
  journal={Neuropsychological Rehabilitation},
  year={2010},
  volume={20},
  pages={289 - 305}
}
The aim of this study was to determine whether it was possible to predict therapy gain from participants' performance on background tests of language and cognitive ability. To do this, we amalgamated the assessment and therapy results from 33 people with aphasia following cerebral vascular accident (CVA), all of whom had received the same anomia therapy (based on progressive phonemic and orthographic cueing). Previous studies with smaller numbers of participants had found a possible… Expand

Paper Mentions

Interventional Clinical Trial
Aphasia is a language impairment caused by brain injury such as stroke that affects the ability to understand and express language, read and write due to damage in the language… Expand
ConditionsAphasia, Language Disorders, Stroke
InterventionBehavioral, Device
Influence of Cognitive Ability on Therapy Outcomes for Anomia in Adults With Chronic Poststroke Aphasia.
TLDR
The findings suggest that individuals' cognitive ability, specifically verbal short-term memory, affects anomia treatment success, and further research into the relationship between cognitive ability and anomian therapy outcomes may help to optimize treatment techniques. Expand
The relationship between novel word learning and anomia treatment success in adults with chronic aphasia
TLDR
It is proposed that novel word learning ability may contribute to the initial acquisition of treatment gains in anomia rehabilitation, and performance on recall and recognition tasks demonstrated that participants were able to learn novel words. Expand
Factors influencing treatment-induced language recovery in chronic, post-stroke aphasia
Although there is evidence to support the efficacy of aphasia rehabilitation, individuals’ response to treatment is often variable. It is currently not possible to determine who will respond to aExpand
The Link Between Verbal Short-Term Memory and Anomia Treatment Gains.
TLDR
Verbal STM, as measured by digit and word spans, did not predict magnitude of change in naming accuracy from pre- to posttreatment nor from pretreatment to 3 months posttreatment, and suggests that span scores may not change significantly. Expand
Facilitating word retrieval in people with aphasia: an exploration of the relationship between language and neuropsychological processing
Background: The challenge of understanding word retrieval is one that has long been the subject of investigation in aphasia therapy research, and has been confounded by the finding that people withExpand
Individualized response to semantic versus phonological aphasia therapies in stroke
TLDR
Semantic treatment may be more beneficial to the improvement of naming performance in aphasia than phonological treatment, at the group-level, and biographical and neuropsychological baseline factors predictive of response to each treatment are examined. Expand
Mapping language and non-language cognitive deficits in post-stroke anomic aphasia
TLDR
The findings suggest that in patients with chronic post-stroke anomia, non-language cognitive abilities explain more of the variance in language function than classical models of the condition imply. Expand
Behavioural and neural changes after a “choice” therapy for naming deficits in aphasia: preliminary findings
Background: Anomia, difficulty producing words, is a pervasive symptom of many individuals with aphasia. We have developed a treatment for naming deficits—the Phonological Components Analysis (PCA)Expand
Understanding the neurobiological basis of reading disorders in aphasia and predicting patients' responses to reading therapy
TLDR
It is demonstrated for the first time, that lesion-site is determinant in patients’ response to therapy and also that therapy response in new patients is predictable. Expand
Determining the Association between Language and Cognitive Tests in Poststroke Aphasia
TLDR
Language and non-linguistic cognitive processes are often interrelated, and most pen-and-paper cognitive tests were significantly associated with both auditory comprehension and naming, even in tests that do not require a verbal response. Expand
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