Predicting species interactions from edge responses: mongoose predation on hawksbill sea turtle nests in fragmented beach habitat

@article{Leighton2008PredictingSI,
  title={Predicting species interactions from edge responses: mongoose predation on hawksbill sea turtle nests in fragmented beach habitat},
  author={Patrick A Leighton and Julia A. Horrocks and Barry H. Krueger and Jennifer A. Beggs and Donald L. Kramer},
  journal={Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences},
  year={2008},
  volume={275},
  pages={2465 - 2472}
}
Because species respond differently to habitat boundaries and spatial overlap affects encounter rates, edge responses should be strong determinants of spatial patterns of species interactions. In the Caribbean, mongooses (Herpestes javanicus) prey on hawksbill sea turtle (Eretmochelys imbricata) eggs. Turtles nest in both open sand and vegetation patches, with a peak in nest abundance near the boundary between the two microhabitats; mongooses rarely leave vegetation. Using both artificial nests… Expand

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