Predicting individual false alarm rates and signal detection theory: A role for remembering

@article{Dobbins2000PredictingIF,
  title={Predicting individual false alarm rates and signal detection theory: A role for remembering},
  author={Ian G. Dobbins and Wayne Khoe and Andrew P. Yonelinas and Neal E. A. Kroll},
  journal={Memory \& Cognition},
  year={2000},
  volume={28},
  pages={1347-1356}
}
The relationships between hit, remember, and false alarm rates were examined across individual subjects in three remember-know experiments in order to determine whether signal detection theory would be consistent with the observed data. The experimental data differed from signal detection predictions in two critical ways. First, remember reports were unrelated, or slightly negatively related, to the commission of false alarms. Second, both response types (remembers and false alarms) were… 
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