Predicting establishment success for alien reptiles and amphibians: a role for climate matching

@article{Bomford2008PredictingES,
  title={Predicting establishment success for alien reptiles and amphibians: a role for climate matching},
  author={Mary Bomford and Fred Kraus and Simon C. Barry and Emma Lawrence},
  journal={Biological Invasions},
  year={2008},
  volume={11},
  pages={713-724}
}
We examined data comprising 1,028 successful and 967 failed introduction records for 596 species of alien reptiles and amphibians around the world to test for factors influencing establishment success. We found significant variations between families and between genera. The number of jurisdictions where a species was introduced was a significant predictor of the probability the species had established in at least one jurisdiction. All species that had been introduced to more than 10… Expand

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