Predicting climate-driven regime shifts versus rebound potential in coral reefs

@article{Graham2015PredictingCR,
  title={Predicting climate-driven regime shifts versus rebound potential in coral reefs},
  author={Nicholas A. J. Graham and Simon Jennings and M. Aaron MacNeil and David Mouillot and Shaun K. Wilson},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2015},
  volume={518},
  pages={94-97}
}
Climate-induced coral bleaching is among the greatest current threats to coral reefs, causing widespread loss of live coral cover. Conditions under which reefs bounce back from bleaching events or shift from coral to algal dominance are unknown, making it difficult to predict and plan for differing reef responses under climate change. Here we document and predict long-term reef responses to a major climate-induced coral bleaching event that caused unprecedented region-wide mortality of Indo… Expand
Productive instability of coral reef fisheries after climate-driven regime shifts
TLDR
Twenty years of catch data and habitat surveys in coral reef fisheries in the Seychelles reveal that total yields can be maintained after severe bleaching and associated regime shifts, but the stability of fisheries is reduced. Expand
Early recovery dynamics of turbid coral reefs after recurring bleaching events.
TLDR
It is shown that coral recovery can be slower in areas of high turbidity and the rate may be reduced by local pressures, such as dredging, and management should focus on improving or maintaining local water quality to increase the likelihood of coral recovery under climate stress. Expand
Drivers and predictions of coral reef carbonate budget trajectories
TLDR
Track the biological carbonate budgets of inner Seychelles reefs from 1994 to 2014, spanning the 1998 global bleaching event when these reefs lost more than 90% of coral cover, highlighting that reef accretion and framework maintenance cannot be assumed from the ecological state alone. Expand
Ecosystem restructuring along the Great Barrier Reef following mass coral bleaching
TLDR
Fish and invertebrate communities transformed across the span of the Great Barrier Reef following the 2016 bleaching event due to a decline in coral-feeding fishes resulting from coral loss, and because of different regional responses of key trophic groups to the direct effect of temperature. Expand
Abiotic and biotic controls on coral recovery 16 years after mass bleaching
AbstractAs climate changes increase heat stress on tropical ecosystems, the long-term persistence of coral reefs requires rapid coral recovery following coral bleaching events. Using the extent ofExpand
Towards Developing a Mechanistic Understanding of Coral Reef Resilience to Thermal Stress Across Multiple Scales
Coral reefs are a globally threatened ecosystem due to a range of anthropogenic impacts. Increasing sea surface temperatures associated with global warming are a particular threat, as corals growExpand
Recruitment Drives Spatial Variation in Recovery Rates of Resilient Coral Reefs
TLDR
The findings suggest that, although the coral community has been resilient, some areas are unlikely to attain the coral cover and taxonomic structure they had prior to the most recent disturbances before the advent of another landscape-scale perturbation. Expand
Remote coral reefs can sustain high growth potential and may match future sea-level trends
TLDR
Climate-induced disturbances are contributing to rapid, global-scale changes in coral reef ecology and these reefs retain the capacity to grow at rates exceeding measured regional mid-late Holocene and 20th century sea-level rise, and close to IPCC sea- level rise projections through to 2100. Expand
Climate-driven shift in coral morphological structure predicts decline of juvenile reef fishes.
TLDR
The findings suggest that continued large-scale shifts in the relative abundance of morphological groups within coral assemblages are likely to affect population replenishment and dynamics of future reef fish communities. Expand
Climate-driven coral reorganisation influences aggressive behaviour in juvenile coral-reef fishes
TLDR
The nature of aggressive interactions varied according to coral composition; on climate-robust reefs, juveniles used the substratum less often to avoid aggression from competitors, and interspecific aggression became relatively more frequent than intraspecific aggression for juveniles of the coral-obligate P. moluccensis. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 72 REFERENCES
Effects of climate-induced coral bleaching on coral-reef fishes - ecological and economic consequences
TLDR
Urgent action on the fundamental causes of climate change and appropriate management of critical elements of habitat structure (coral cover and topographic complexity) are key to ensuring long-term persistence of coral-reef fishes. Expand
Coral Reefs Under Rapid Climate Change and Ocean Acidification
TLDR
As the International Year of the Reef 2008 begins, scaled-up management intervention and decisive action on global emissions are required if the loss of coral-dominated ecosystems is to be avoided. Expand
Recovery of an Isolated Coral Reef System Following Severe Disturbance
TLDR
It is shown that isolated reefs can recover from major disturbance, and that the benefits of their isolation from chronic anthropogenic pressures can outweigh the costs of limited connectivity. Expand
Climate Warming, Marine Protected Areas and the Ocean-Scale Integrity of Coral Reef Ecosystems
TLDR
Using Bayesian meta-analysis, it is shown that changes in the size structure, diversity and trophic composition of the reef fish community have followed coral declines, suggesting a need for future conservation and management efforts to identify and protect regional refugia. Expand
Coral Reef Community Composition in the Context of Disturbance History on the Great Barrier Reef, Australia
TLDR
A spatial assessment of coral reef communities across five reefs of the central Great Barrier Reef, Australia, with known disturbance histories, and assessed patterns of coral cover and community composition related to a range of other variables thought to be important for reef dynamics. Expand
Coral–macroalgal phase shifts or reef resilience: links with diversity and functional roles of herbivorous fishes on the Great Barrier Reef
TLDR
This study records the development of the most persistent coral–macroalgal phase shift yet observed on Australia’s Great Barrier Reef and suggests that reefs could lose resilience under relatively low fishing pressure. Expand
Gear-based fisheries management as a potential adaptive response to climate change and coral mortality
TLDR
Given that full fisheries closures are not always practical, selectively banning or restricting fishing gears is a potentially powerful tool for reducing the detrimental ecosystem effects of climate change disturbances. Expand
Bottlenecks to coral recovery in the Seychelles
TLDR
This study identified bottlenecks to recovery of coral assemblages that varied depending on post-disturbance habitat condition and identified a bottleneck caused by low juvenile colony survivorship on unconsolidated rubble-dominated reefs. Expand
Dynamic fragility of oceanic coral reef ecosystems.
TLDR
It is shown that climate change-driven loss of live coral, and ultimately structural complexity, in the Seychelles results in local extinctions, substantial reductions in species richness, reduced taxonomic distinctness, and a loss of species within key functional groups of reef fish. Expand
Marine Reserves Enhance the Recovery of Corals on Caribbean Reefs
TLDR
This work investigates whether reductions in macroalgal cover, caused by recovery of herbivorous parrotfishes within a reserve, have resulted in a faster rate of coral recovery than in areas subject to fishing, and reduces herbivore exploitation as part of an ecosystem-based management strategy for coral reefs appears to be justified. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...