Predator exaptations and defensive adaptations in evolutionary balance: No defence is perfect

@article{Yosef2005PredatorEA,
  title={Predator exaptations and defensive adaptations in evolutionary balance: No defence is perfect},
  author={R. Yosef and D. Whitman},
  journal={Evolutionary Ecology},
  year={2005},
  volume={6},
  pages={527-536}
}
SummaryThe lubber grasshopper,Romalea guttata, is large, aposematic, and extremely toxic. In feeding trials with 21 bird and lizard species, none were able to consume this chemically defended prey. Predators that attempted to eat lubbers, often gagged, regurgitated, and sometimes died. Loggerhead shrikes,Lanius ludovicianus, regularly impale this toxic prey in peninsular Florida. They, like other bird species, are unable to consume fresh lubbers. However, our tests show that they are able to… Expand
34 Citations

Figures from this paper

Large size as an antipredator defense in an insect
Taxon-specific prey handling by the loggerhead shrike (Lanius ludovicianus)
Predator Mixes and the Conspicuousness of Aposematic Signals
Pretty Picky for a Generalist: Impacts of Toxicity and Nutritional Quality on Mantid Prey Processing
...
1
2
3
4
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 44 REFERENCES
A generalist herbivore in a specialist mode Metabolic, sequestrative, and defensive consequences
Birds can overcome the cardenolide defence of monarch butterflies in Mexico
FORAGING DYNAMICS OF BIRD PREDATORS ON OVERWINTERING MONARCH BUTTERFLIES IN MEXICO
An Evolutionary and Ecological Perspective of the Insect Fauna of Ferns
...
1
2
3
4
5
...