Predator detection and evasion by flying insects

@article{Yager2012PredatorDA,
  title={Predator detection and evasion by flying insects},
  author={David D. Yager},
  journal={Current Opinion in Neurobiology},
  year={2012},
  volume={22},
  pages={201-207}
}
  • D. D. Yager
  • Published 2012
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Current Opinion in Neurobiology
Echolocating bats detect prey using ultrasonic pulses, and many nocturnally flying insects effectively detect and evade these predators through sensitive ultrasonic hearing. Many eared insects can use the intensity of the predator-generated ultrasound and the stereotyped progression of bat echolocation pulse rate to assess risk level. Effective responses can vary from gentle turns away from the threat (low risk) to sudden random flight and dives (highest risk). Recent research with eared moths… Expand
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