Predator Cognition Permits Imperfect Coral Snake Mimicry

@article{Kikuchi2010PredatorCP,
  title={Predator Cognition Permits Imperfect Coral Snake Mimicry},
  author={David William Kikuchi and David W. Pfennig},
  journal={The American Naturalist},
  year={2010},
  volume={176},
  pages={830 - 834}
}
Batesian mimicry is often imprecise. An underexplored explanation for imperfect mimicry is that predators might not be able to use all dimensions of prey phenotype to distinguish mimics from models and thus permit imperfect mimicry to persist. We conducted a field experiment to test whether or not predators can distinguish deadly coral snakes (Micrurus fulvius) from nonvenomous scarlet kingsnakes (Lampropeltis elapsoides). Although the two species closely resemble one another, the order of… 
A Batesian mimic and its model share color production mechanisms
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It is shown that a Batesian mimic, the scarlet kingsnake Lampropeltis elapsoides , produces its coloration using the same physiological mechanisms as does its model, the eastern coral snake Micrurus fulvius, therefore, precise color mimicry may have been able to evolve easily in this system.
Imperfect Mimicry and the Limits of Natural Selection
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It is found that the relaxed selection hypothesis has garnered the most support, and should provide critical insights into the limits of natural selection in producing complex adaptations.
Diversity of warning signal and social interaction influences the evolution of imperfect mimicry
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It is suggested that the evolution of new patterns could be favored by social learning in areas of low pattern diversity, while individual learning can reduce predation pressure on recently evolved mimics in areas that differ in model pattern richness.
Competition and the evolution of imperfect mimicry
TLDR
This work considers whether imperfect mimicry represents an evolutionary compromise between predator-mediated selection favoring mimetic conver- gence and competitively mediated selection favoring divergence, and reviews the various ways in which character displacement could promote imprecise mimicry.
Which traits do observers use to distinguish Batesian mimics from their models?
TLDR
It is found that shape is a particularly useful and easily learnt trait for separating the two taxa, and color similarity between wasps and hoverflies is relatively high in comparison with other traits, suggesting that selection has acted more strongly on color.
Do crab spiders perceive Batesian mimicry in hoverflies
TLDR
It is found that crab spiders, which are important predators of many mimetic hoverflies, use visual cues to differentiate among prey types, and that they may select for (potentially inaccurate) mimicry.
Being a bright snake: Testing aposematism and mimicry in a neotropical forest
TLDR
Interestingly, opossum avoided the Micrurus corallinus and Erythrolamprus aesculapii replicas that resembled the model, suggesting that opportunistic predators, as the opossums, may be important selective agents in mimicry complexes.
Selective advantage conferred by resemblance of aposematic mimics to venomous model
TLDR
This study underscores the strong selective force that protects coral snake mimics from predators and reinforces resemblance to the model as an extremely effective strategy in a complex natural system with only one model and numerous mimics.
PREDATOR PERCEPTION OF BATESIAN MIMICRY AND CONSPICUOUSNESS IN A SALAMANDER
TLDR
The expectation that the visual abilities of predators may influence the evolution of Batesian mimicry is confirmed, but the role of conspicuousness may be more complex than previously thought.
Predatory pollinator deception: Does the orchid mantis resemble a model species?
TLDR
It is suggested that the orchid mantis resembles an average, or generalised flower-like stimulus, and is likely to function as a form of generalised food deception, as opposed to model mimicry.
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