Predator–prey interactions, flight initiation distance and brain size

@article{Mller2014PredatorpreyIF,
  title={Predator–prey interactions, flight initiation distance and brain size},
  author={Anders Pape M{\o}ller and Johannes Erritz{\o}e},
  journal={Journal of Evolutionary Biology},
  year={2014},
  volume={27}
}
Prey avoid being eaten by assessing the risk posed by approaching predators and responding accordingly. Such an assessment may result in prey–predator communication and signalling, which entail further monitoring of the predator by prey. An early antipredator response may provide potential prey with a selective advantage, although this benefit comes at the cost of disturbance in terms of lost foraging opportunities and increased energy expenditure. Therefore, it may pay prey to assess… 
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