Predation Risk Influences the Use of Foraging Sites by Tits

@article{Suhonen1993PredationRI,
  title={Predation Risk Influences the Use of Foraging Sites by Tits},
  author={J. Suhonen},
  journal={Ecology},
  year={1993},
  volume={74},
  pages={1197-1203}
}
In coniferous forests of Central Finland, tits (Paridae) and the Goldcrest (Regulus regulus) exploit nonrenewable resources in their group territories during the winter. Results of many studies have indicated that interspecific competition restricts the use of foraging sites in mixed—species winter flocks. However predation is a significant mortality factor in these species, and predation risk might also restrict the selection of foraging sites. The Pygmy Owl (Glaucidium passerinum) is the main… Expand
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