Preadolescent attitudes toward the elderly: an analysis of race, gender and contact variables.

Abstract

Preadolescent attitudes toward the elderly were examined through analysis of race, gender, and contact variables. Subjects were randomly selected preadolescents (mean = 12.8 years), a total of 157 students (91 boys and 66 girls), comprising three ethnic groups (49% white, 30% Mexican-American, 21% black). The investigator instructed each student to complete the Tuckman-Lorge Old People Scale, and a self-report contact questionnaire, thereby establishing three contact groups (high, medium, low). Data were analyzed via an ANOVA. The results revealed that only one of the variables studied, race, was significantly related to attitudes toward the elderly. The white preadolescents possessed the most positive attitudes toward the elderly. The greatest differences were between the white and black female preadolescents. These results suggest that preadolescent attitudes toward the elderly are culturally related. It can be concluded that as a variable, race should receive more attention in future attitudinal studies of the preadolescent.

Cite this paper

@article{Harris1988PreadolescentAT, title={Preadolescent attitudes toward the elderly: an analysis of race, gender and contact variables.}, author={Jared Harris and Christoph Fiedler}, journal={Adolescence}, year={1988}, volume={23 90}, pages={335-40} }