Corpus ID: 23170122

Practice recommendations for preventing heel pressure ulcers.

@article{Fowler2008PracticeRF,
  title={Practice recommendations for preventing heel pressure ulcers.},
  author={Evonne M Fowler and Susan Scott-Williams and James B McGuire},
  journal={Ostomy/wound management},
  year={2008},
  volume={54 10},
  pages={
          42-8, 50-2, 54-7
        }
}
Heels are the second most common anatomical location for pressure ulcers. A combination of risk factors, including pressure, may cause ulceration. Heel pressure ulcers are a particular concern for surgical patients. A review of the literature, including poster presentations, shows that controlled clinical studies to assess the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of available interventions are not available. Case series (with or without historical controls) as well as pressure ulcer guideline… Expand

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