Practice Bulletin No. 165: Prevention and Management of Obstetric Lacerations at Vaginal Delivery.

@article{2016PracticeBN,
  title={Practice Bulletin No. 165: Prevention and Management of Obstetric Lacerations at Vaginal Delivery.},
  author={},
  journal={Obstetrics \& Gynecology},
  year={2016}
}
  • Published 2016
  • Medicine
  • Obstetrics & Gynecology
Lacerations are common after vaginal birth. Trauma can occur on the cervix, vagina, and vulva, including the labial, periclitoral, and periurethral regions, and the perineum. Most of these lacerations do not result in adverse functional outcomes. Severe perineal lacerations, extending into or through the anal sphincter complex, although less frequent, are more commonly associated with increased risk of pelvic floor injury, fecal and urinary incontinence, pain, and sexual dysfunction with… 
59 Citations
Severe perineal lacerations after vaginal delivery: are they an anesthesiologist's problem?
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Neuraxial labor analgesia does not directly predispose parturients to the development of perineal lacerations, and may even be protective against these injuries.
Severe perineal lacerations after vaginal delivery: are they an anesthesiologist's problem?
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Neuraxial labor analgesia does not directly predispose parturients to the development of perineal lacerations, and may even be protective against these injuries.
Obstetric Anal Sphincter Injuries (OASIs) in Israel: A Review of the Incidence and Risk Factors
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Structured hands-on training in repair of OASIs in seven medical centers in Israel significantly increased the detection rate of third-degree perineal tears, which is 10-fold lower than that reported in Europe and the United States.
Perineal Lacerations: A Retrospective Study in a Habitual-Risk Public Maternity.
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Births attended by nurses resulted in an increased risk of perineal lacerations, of varying degrees, and those assisted by physicians had a higher occurrence of episiotomy, as reported in the literature.
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The role of mediolateral episiotomy during operative vaginal delivery.
WITHDRAWN: The role of mediolateral episiotomy during operative vaginal delivery
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  • Medicine
    The journal of maternal-fetal & neonatal medicine : the official journal of the European Association of Perinatal Medicine, the Federation of Asia and Oceania Perinatal Societies, the International Society of Perinatal Obstetricians
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This review will shed light on the historical background of episiotomy, its different techniques, indications, and the future of its practice.
Does meperidine analgesia affect the incidence of obstetric lacerations at vaginal delivery?
  • Y. Mizrachi, Sophia Leytes, M. Kovo
  • Medicine
    The journal of maternal-fetal & neonatal medicine : the official journal of the European Association of Perinatal Medicine, the Federation of Asia and Oceania Perinatal Societies, the International Society of Perinatal Obstetricians
  • 2018
TLDR
Meperidine analgesia may have a protective effect against first- and second-degree perineal lacerations in women with term vertex singleton pregnancies who underwent normal vaginal deliveries.
Perineal trauma: incidence and its risk factors
TLDR
The incidence of perineal trauma in this study indicated a high incidence and agrees with the existing literature that maternal age, parity, the induction of labour, gestational age, fundal pressure and nationality are associated with perineAL trauma; however, other factors were not found as predictors in the authors' study.
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