Poxviruses and the Origin of the Eukaryotic Nucleus

@article{Takemura2001PoxvirusesAT,
  title={Poxviruses and the Origin of the Eukaryotic Nucleus},
  author={M. Takemura},
  journal={Journal of Molecular Evolution},
  year={2001},
  volume={52},
  pages={419-425}
}
  • M. Takemura
  • Published 2001
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Journal of Molecular Evolution
Abstract. A number of molecular forms of DNA polymerases have been reported to be involved in eukaryotic nuclear DNA replication, with contributions from α-, δ-, and ε-polymerases. It has been reported that δ-polymerase possessed a central role in DNA replication in archaea, whose ancestry are thought to be closely related to the ancestor of eukaryotes. Indeed, in vitro experiment shown here suggests that δ-polymerase has the potential ability to start DNA synthesis immediately after RNA primer… Expand
Evolution and degeneration of eukaryotic DNA replication system.
TLDR
The 'exogenous' polymerase would be expected to be excluded from the eukaryotic DNA replication system, and the analysis in the present study suggests it is about to degenerate. Expand
Medusavirus Ancestor in a Proto-Eukaryotic Cell: Updating the Hypothesis for the Viral Origin of the Nucleus
  • M. Takemura
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Frontiers in Microbiology
  • 2020
TLDR
A new scenario explaining the origin of the eukaryotic nucleus from the perspective of viral participation is proposed, and several features of the recently identified Acanthamoeba castellanii medusavirus suggest that the evolutionary relationship between ancestral viral factory and eukARYotic nucleus is disturbed. Expand
Why are there so many diverse replication machineries?
  • P. Forterre
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Journal of molecular biology
  • 2013
TLDR
Comparison of DNA replication proteins in the three domains, Archaea, Bacteria, and Eukarya, have surprisingly revealed the existence of two distinct sets of non-homologous cellular DNA replication protein, suggesting that the last universal common ancestor possibly still had an RNA genome. Expand
Evolution of Eukaryotic DNA Polymerases via Interaction Between Cells and Large DNA Viruses
TLDR
Molecular phylogenetic analyses of the B-family DNA polymerases from nucleo-cytoplasmic large DNA viruses, eukaryotes, and archaea suggest that different NCLDV lineages such as Poxviridae and Mimiviridae were involved in the evolution of different DNA polymerase genes in archaeal–eukaryotic cell lineages, putatively through horizontal gene transfer. Expand
Three RNA cells for ribosomal lineages and three DNA viruses to replicate their genomes: a hypothesis for the origin of cellular domain.
  • P. Forterre
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
  • 2006
TLDR
This work explores the possibility that three such independent transfers were at the origin of Archaea, Bacteria, and Eukarya, respectively, and explains why each domain has its specific DNA replication apparatus. Expand
Origin and Evolution of DNA and DNA Replication Machineries
TLDR
Proposed hypotheses, including independent invention of DNA and DNA replication proteins, ancient gene transfer and gene loss, and/or nonorthologous replacement are reviewed, with more emphasis on recent proposals suggesting that viruses have played a major role in the origin and evolution of theDNA replication proteins and possibly of DNA itself. Expand
Evidence supporting a viral origin of the eukaryotic nucleus.
TLDR
Phylogenetic analysis of the m7G capping apparatus shows that eukaryotic nuclei and Mimiviridae obtained this shared pathway from a common ancestral source that predated the origin of the Last Eukaryosis Common Ancestor (LECA). Expand
The origin of viruses and their possible roles in major evolutionary transitions.
TLDR
According to these new hypotheses, viruses played a critical role in major evolutionary transitions, such as the invention of DNA and DNA replication mechanisms, the formation of the three domains of life, or else, the origin of the eukaryotic nucleus. Expand
Evolutionary history of the retinoblastoma gene from archaea to eukarya.
TLDR
It is concluded that the pocket A and B regions, backbones of the Rb protein are derived from different organisms, respectively, the ancestors of archaeote and poxvirus, and that the ancestral pocket B region has been lost during evolutionary history of unicellular eukaryotes. Expand
The 1.2-Megabase Genome Sequence of Mimivirus
TLDR
The size and complexity of the Mimivirus genome challenge the established frontier between viruses and parasitic cellular organisms and this new sequence data might help shed a new light on the origin of DNA viruses and their role in the early evolution of eukaryotes. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 39 REFERENCES
A heterodimeric DNA polymerase: evidence that members of Euryarchaeota possess a distinct DNA polymerase.
TLDR
Sequence analysis showed that considerable similarity exists between DP1 and the second subunit of eukaryotic DNA polymerase delta, a protein essential for the propagation of Eukarya, and that DP2 has conserved motifs found in proteins with nucleotide-polymerizing activity. Expand
Structural and functional relationships between prokaryotic and eukaryotic DNA polymerases.
TLDR
Comparison of DNA polymerases from prokaryotic and eukaryotic origin showed extensive amino acid homology in addition to highly conserved domains, which reflect evolutionary relationships between hypothetically unrelatedDNA polymerases. Expand
Human DNA polymerase α: predicted functional domains and relationships with viral DNA polymerases
  • T. S. Wang, S. W. Wong, D. Korn
  • Biology, Medicine
  • FASEB journal : official publication of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology
  • 1989
The primary sequence of human DNA polymerase α deduced from the full‐length cDNA contains regions of striking similarity to sequences in replicative DNA polymerases from Escherichia coli phages PRD1Expand
Archaea and the Origin(s) of DNA Replication Proteins
TLDR
Replication thus joins transcription and translation in compounding the central conundrum of cellular evolution, illustrated in Figure 1, with the uncoupling of molecular complexity in transcription, translation, and replication from complexity in cell structure is most peculiar. Expand
Organization and nucleotide sequence of the DNA polymerase gene from the archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus.
TLDR
The gene encoding the thermostable DNA polymerase from the archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus was cloned and an unrooted phylogenetic tree of the alpha-like DNA polymerases based on the amino acid sequence alignment was constructed. Expand
Archaebacterial DNA-dependent RNA polymerases testify to the evolution of the eukaryotic nuclear genome.
TLDR
Unrooted phylogenetic dendrograms derived from both distance matrix and parsimony analyses show the archaebacteria are a coherent group closely related to the eukaryotic nuclear RNA polymerase II and/or III lineages. Expand
Evidence of independent gene duplications during the evolution of archaeal and eukaryotic family B DNA polymerases.
TLDR
Phylogenetic analysis of eukaryotic and archaeal paralogs suggests that the gene duplications that gave rise to the three replicative par analogs occurred before the divergence of the earliest eukARYotic lineages, and that all eukariotes are likely to possess theseParalogs. Expand
Gene duplications in evolution of archaeal family B DNA polymerases
TLDR
The gene for yet a third family B DNA polymerase, designated B3, is found in the crenarchaeote S. solfataricus P2 and it is suggested that the S. shibatae B3 paralogs are related to one of the two DNA polymerases of P. occultum. Expand
Poxviruses: An emerging portrait of biological strategy
TLDR
Perhaps the most lasting impression of vaccinia is as a virus that encodes a unique repertoire of proteins governing its survival within the host, which may activate the next round of cells to be infected, reduce the activation of cells responsible for the inflammatory response, and sabotage the biochemical cascades of host defenses. Expand
Mitochondrial genome evolution and the origin of eukaryotes.
TLDR
Defining more precisely the alpha-proteobacterial ancestry of the mitochondrial genome, and the contribution of the endosymbiotic event to the nuclear genome, will be essential for a full understanding of the origin and evolution of the eukaryotic cell as a whole. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
...