Poxviruses and the Origin of the Eukaryotic Nucleus

@article{Takemura2001PoxvirusesAT,
  title={Poxviruses and the Origin of the Eukaryotic Nucleus},
  author={M. Takemura},
  journal={Journal of Molecular Evolution},
  year={2001},
  volume={52},
  pages={419-425}
}
  • M. Takemura
  • Published 2001
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Journal of Molecular Evolution
  • Abstract. A number of molecular forms of DNA polymerases have been reported to be involved in eukaryotic nuclear DNA replication, with contributions from α-, δ-, and ε-polymerases. It has been reported that δ-polymerase possessed a central role in DNA replication in archaea, whose ancestry are thought to be closely related to the ancestor of eukaryotes. Indeed, in vitro experiment shown here suggests that δ-polymerase has the potential ability to start DNA synthesis immediately after RNA primer… CONTINUE READING

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