Power failure: why small sample size undermines the reliability of neuroscience

@article{Button2013PowerFW,
  title={Power failure: why small sample size undermines the reliability of neuroscience},
  author={K. Button and J. Ioannidis and C. Mokrysz and Brian A. Nosek and J. Flint and E. Robinson and M. Munaf{\`o}},
  journal={Nature Reviews Neuroscience},
  year={2013},
  volume={14},
  pages={365-376}
}
A study with low statistical power has a reduced chance of detecting a true effect, but it is less well appreciated that low power also reduces the likelihood that a statistically significant result reflects a true effect. Here, we show that the average statistical power of studies in the neurosciences is very low. The consequences of this include overestimates of effect size and low reproducibility of results. There are also ethical dimensions to this problem, as unreliable research is… Expand

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