Power Versus Affiliation in Political Ideology: Robust Linguistic Evidence for Distinct Motivation-Related Signatures.

@article{Fetterman2015PowerVA,
  title={Power Versus Affiliation in Political Ideology: Robust Linguistic Evidence for Distinct Motivation-Related Signatures.},
  author={Adam K. Fetterman and Ryan L. Boyd and Michael D. Robinson},
  journal={Personality & social psychology bulletin},
  year={2015},
  volume={41 9},
  pages={
          1195-206
        }
}
Posited motivational differences between liberals and conservatives have historically been controversial. This motivational interface has recently been bridged, but the vast majority of studies have used self-reports of values or motivation. Instead, the present four studies investigated whether two classic social motive themes--power and affiliation--vary by political ideology in objective linguistic analysis terms. Study 1 found that posts to liberal chat rooms scored higher in standardized… CONTINUE READING
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