Potentiation of Warfarin by Dong Quai

@article{Page1999PotentiationOW,
  title={Potentiation of Warfarin by Dong Quai},
  author={Robert Lee Page and J D Lawrence},
  journal={Pharmacotherapy: The Journal of Human Pharmacology and Drug Therapy},
  year={1999},
  volume={19}
}
  • R. Page, J. D. Lawrence
  • Published 1 July 1999
  • Medicine
  • Pharmacotherapy: The Journal of Human Pharmacology and Drug Therapy
Dong quai is a Chinese herbal supplement touted for treatment of menstrual cramping, irregular menses, and menopausal symptoms. Phytochemical analyses found it to consist of natural coumarin derivatives, as well as constituents possessing antithrombotic, antiarrhythmic, phototoxic, and carcinogenic effects. A 46‐year‐old African‐American woman with atrial fibrillation stabilized on warfarin experienced a greater than 2‐fold elevation in prothrombin time and international normalized ratio after… Expand
Chemical Information Review Document for Dong quai
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Dong quai has been used for thousands of years in traditional Chinese, Korean, and Japanese medicine. Dong quai is marketed in the United States as a dietary supplement. It has been used to treat aExpand
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