Potential pediatric intensive care unit demand/capacity mismatch due to novel pH1N1 in Canada

@article{Stiff2011PotentialPI,
  title={Potential pediatric intensive care unit demand/capacity mismatch due to novel pH1N1 in Canada},
  author={David Stiff and Anand Kumar and Niranjan Kissoon and R. A. Fowler and Philippe A Jouvet and Peter Skippen and P. Smetanin and Murray Kesselman and Stasa Veroukis},
  journal={Pediatric Critical Care Medicine},
  year={2011},
  volume={12},
  pages={e51-e57}
}
Objective: To investigate the possibility of pediatric intensive care unit shortfalls, using pandemic models for a range of attack rates and durations. The emergence of the swine origin pH1N1 virus has led to concerns about shortfalls in our ability to provide pediatric ventilation and critical care support. Design: Modeling of pediatric intensive care demand based on pH1N1 predictions using simulation techniques. Setting: Simulation laboratory. Patients: None. Interventions: None. Measurements… 
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