Potential for Chemolithoautotrophy Among Ubiquitous Bacteria Lineages in the Dark Ocean

@article{Swan2011PotentialFC,
  title={Potential for Chemolithoautotrophy Among Ubiquitous Bacteria Lineages in the Dark Ocean},
  author={Brandon K. Swan and Manuel Mart{\'i}nez-Garc{\'i}a and Christina M. Preston and Alexander Sczyrba and Tanja Woyke and Dominique Lamy and Thomas Reinthaler and Nicole J. Poulton and E. Dashiell P. Masland and Monica Lluesma Gomez and Michael E. Sieracki and Edward F. Delong and Gerhard J. Herndl and Ramunas Stepanauskas},
  journal={Science},
  year={2011},
  volume={333},
  pages={1296 - 1300}
}
Recent studies suggest that unidentified prokaryotes fix inorganic carbon at globally significant rates in the immense dark ocean. [...] Key Result Using single-cell sorting and whole-genome amplification of prokaryotes from two subtropical gyres, we obtained genomic DNA from 738 cells representing most cosmopolitan lineages.Expand
Ubiquitous Gammaproteobacteria dominate dark carbon fixation in coastal sediments
TLDR
It is proposed that a stable assemblage of metabolically flexible Gammaproteobacteria drives important parts of marine carbon and sulfur cycles.
Major role of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria in dark ocean carbon fixation
TLDR
Evidence is shown that nitrite-oxidizing bacteria affiliated with the Nitrospinae phylum are important in dark ocean chemoautotrophy, and nitrite oxidation may have a greater impact on the carbon cycle than previously assumed.
Undocumented potential for primary productivity in a globally-distributed bacterial photoautotroph
TLDR
A novel clade within the Alphaproteobacteria that has the potential for photoautotrophy is identified, which may require re-examination of the microbial communities in the global ocean to understand and constrain the impacts of this group of organisms on the global carbon cycle.
Morphological Plasticity in a Sulfur-Oxidizing Marine Bacterium from the SUP05 Clade Enhances Dark Carbon Fixation
TLDR
This work uses growth experiments, proteomics, and cryo-electron tomography to show that a SUP05 isolate, “Candidatus Thioglobus autotrophicus,” is amorphous in shape and several times larger and stores considerably more intracellular sulfur when it respires oxygen.
Sulfur oxidizers dominate carbon fixation at a biogeochemical hot spot in the dark ocean
TLDR
Proteomic data suggest that free-living sulfur oxidizers and methylotrophs are among the dominant primary producers in vent plume waters in the northeastern Pacific Ocean.
Genome diversification in globally distributed novel marine Proteobacteria is linked to environmental adaptation
TLDR
51 metagenome-assembled genomes from three hydrothermal vent plumes in the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans that are affiliated with nine Proteobacteria lineages are characterized to contain a diverse functional repertoire including chemolithotrophic ability to utilize sulfur and C 1 compounds, and chemoorganotrophic able to utilize environment-derived fatty acids, aromatics, carbohydrates, and peptides.
Microbes mediating the sulfur cycle in the Atlantic Ocean and their link to chemolithoautotrophy.
TLDR
The contribution of the SRP to the prokaryotic community harboring aprA gene was low, suggesting a major utilization of inorganic sulfur compounds either as energy source (occasionally coupled with inorganic carbon fixation) or in biosynthesis pathways.
Deep ocean metagenomes provide insight into the metabolic architecture of bathypelagic microbial communities
TLDR
Reconstruction of the Malaspina Deep Metagenome-Assembled Genomes reveals unique non-cyanobacterial diazotrophic bacteria and chemolithoautotrophic prokaryotes, suggesting that mixotrophy is an ecologically relevant trait in the deep ocean.
Illuminating microbial metabolic activities in the dark deep ocean with metaproteomics
TLDR
The protein evidence provided firstly including both particulate and dissolved fractions to comprehensively decipher the active microbes and metabolic processes involved in the DOM recycling in the deep ocean supported the hypothesis of the carbon and energy supply from the labile DOM after the solution of sinking particles to the bathypelagic microbial community.
Genome diversification in globally distributed novel marine Proteobacteria is linked to environmental adaptation
TLDR
This work applies multi-omics to characterize 51 metagenome-assembled genomes from three hydrothermal vent plumes in the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans that are affiliated with nine novel Proteobacteria lineages and revealed these organisms to contain a diverse functional repertoire including chemolithotrophic ability to utilize sulfur and C1 compounds, and chemoorganotrophic able to utilize environment-derived fatty acids, aromatics, carbohydrates, and peptides.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 38 REFERENCES
Contribution of Crenarchaeota and Bacteria to autotrophy in the North Atlantic interior.
TLDR
Taking the stoichiometry of nitrification together with the findings suggests that MCGI might not dominate the ammonia oxidation step in the mesopelagic waters of the ocean to that extent as the reported dominance of archaeal over bacterial amoA would suggest.
Microbial oceanography of the dark ocean's pelagic realm
TLDR
The advent of new molecular tools and in situ sampling methodologies will improve knowledge of the dark ocean’s microbial ecosystem and resolve current discrepancies between carbon sources and metabolic requirements of deep-sea microbes.
Matching phylogeny and metabolism in the uncultured marine bacteria, one cell at a time
TLDR
The power of this approach lies in the ability to detect metabolic genes in uncultured microorganisms directly, even when the metabolic and phylogenetic markers are located far apart on the chromosome.
Contribution of Archaea to Total Prokaryotic Production in the Deep Atlantic Ocean
ABSTRACT Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in combination with polynucleotide probes revealed that the two major groups of planktonic Archaea (Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota) exhibit a
Metabolic streamlining in an open-ocean nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium
TLDR
It is found that UCYN-A lacks a number of major metabolic pathways including the tricarboxylic acid cycle, but retains sufficient electron transport capacity to generate energy and reducing power from light, and is dependent on other organisms for essential compounds.
Major contribution of autotrophy to microbial carbon cycling in the deep North Atlantic’s interior
TLDR
Quantifying dissolved inorganic carbon fixation in the meso- and bathypelagic water column of the North Atlantic revealed that chemoautotrophy in the dark ocean represents a significant source of autochthonously produced ‘new organic carbon’ in the ocean’s interior amounting to about 15–53% of the phytoplankton export production.
Metagenome of a Versatile Chemolithoautotroph from Expanding Oceanic Dead Zones
TLDR
Analysis of a ubiquitous and abundant but uncultivated oxygen minimum zone microbe related to chemoautotrophic gill symbionts of deep-sea clams and mussels provides a genomic foundation for understanding the ecological and biogeochemical role of pelagic SUP05 in oxygen-deficient oceanic waters and its potential sensitivity to environmental changes.
Assembling the Marine Metagenome, One Cell at a Time
TLDR
The power of single cell DNA sequencing to generate reference genomes of uncultured taxa from a complex microbial community of marine bacterioplankton is demonstrated.
Bacterial chemolithotrophy in the ocean is associated with sinking particles
The oceanic carbon cycle has traditionally been viewed as a reversible, one step reduction–oxidation reaction (CO2\[rlharr]CH2O). Principle pathways were thought to involve eukaryotic photoautotrophy
A Cryptic Sulfur Cycle in Oxygen-Minimum–Zone Waters off the Chilean Coast
TLDR
It is shown that both sulfate reduction and sulfide oxidation contribute to energy flux and elemental cycling in oxygen-free waters off the coast of northern Chile, suggesting that it may influence biogeochemical cycling in the global ocean.
...
1
2
3
4
...