Potential Uses of Corticotropin‐Releasing Hormone Antagonists

@article{Zoumakis2006PotentialUO,
  title={Potential Uses of Corticotropin‐Releasing Hormone Antagonists},
  author={Emmanouil Zoumakis and Kenner C. Rice and Philip W. Gold and George P. Chrousos},
  journal={Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences},
  year={2006},
  volume={1083}
}
Abstract:  Corticotropin‐releasing hormone (CRH), its natural homologs urocortins (UCN) 1, 2, and 3, and several types of CRH receptors (R), coordinate the behavioral, endocrine, autonomic, and immune responses to stress. The potential use of CRH antagonists is currently under intense investigation. Selective antagonists have been used experimentally to clarify the role of CRH‐related peptides in anxiety and depression, addictive behavior, inflammatory disorders, acute and chronic… 
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