Potassium isotopic evidence for a high-energy giant impact origin of the Moon

@article{Wang2016PotassiumIE,
  title={Potassium isotopic evidence for a high-energy giant impact origin of the Moon},
  author={Kun Wang and Stein B. Jacobsen},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2016},
  volume={538},
  pages={487-490}
}
The Earth–Moon system has unique chemical and isotopic signatures compared with other planetary bodies; any successful model for the origin of this system therefore has to satisfy these chemical and isotopic constraints. The Moon is substantially depleted in volatile elements such as potassium compared with the Earth and the bulk solar composition, and it has long been thought to be the result of a catastrophic Moon-forming giant impact event. Volatile-element-depleted bodies such as the Moon… 

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