Postprandial energy expenditure in whole-food and processed-food meals: implications for daily energy expenditure

@article{Barr2010PostprandialEE,
  title={Postprandial energy expenditure in whole-food and processed-food meals: implications for daily energy expenditure},
  author={Sadie B. Barr and Jonathan C. Wright},
  journal={Food \& Nutrition Research},
  year={2010},
  volume={54}
}
Background Empirical evidence has shown that rising obesity rates closely parallel the increased consumption of processed foods (PF) consumption in USA. Differences in postprandial thermogenic responses to a whole-food (WF) meal vs. a PF meal may be a key factor in explaining obesity trends, but currently there is limited research exploring this potential link. Objective The goal was to determine if a particular PF meal has a greater thermodynamic efficiency than a comparable WF meal, thereby… 

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