Postoperative Deep Surgical-Site Infection after Instrumented Spinal Surgery: A Multicenter Study

Abstract

A retrospective survey revealed 37 cases (1.1%) of deep surgical-site infection (SSI) among 3,462 instrumented spinal surgeries between 2004 and 2008. Excluding 8 patients who were unclassifiable, we categorized 29 patients into 3 groups of similar backgrounds-thoracolumbar degenerative disease (the DEG group; n = 15), osteoporotic vertebral collapse (the OVC group; n = 10), and cervical disorders (the cervical group; n = 4)-and investigated the key to implant salvage. Final respective implant retention rates for the groups were 40, 0, and 100%, with the OVC group having the worst rate (p < 0.01). In the DEG group with early infection, those whose implants were retained had lower body temperatures, lower white blood cell counts, and a lower rate of discharge at the time of SSI diagnosis (p < 0.05). Implant retention may be affected by initial spinal pathology. In the DEG group, debridement before drainage may be advantageous to implant salvage.

DOI: 10.1055/s-0033-1343072

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Cite this paper

@inproceedings{Ishii2013PostoperativeDS, title={Postoperative Deep Surgical-Site Infection after Instrumented Spinal Surgery: A Multicenter Study}, author={Masayoshi Ishii and Motoki Iwasaki and Tetsuo Ohwada and Takenori Oda and Takashi Matsuoka and Yuichi Tamura and Kazutaka Izawa}, booktitle={Global spine journal}, year={2013} }