Postexercise Hypertrophic Adaptations: A Reexamination of the Hormone Hypothesis and Its Applicability to Resistance Training Program Design

@article{Schoenfeld2013PostexerciseHA,
  title={Postexercise Hypertrophic Adaptations: A Reexamination of the Hormone Hypothesis and Its Applicability to Resistance Training Program Design},
  author={Brad Jon Schoenfeld},
  journal={Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research},
  year={2013},
  volume={27},
  pages={1720–1730}
}
  • B. Schoenfeld
  • Published 1 June 2013
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research
Abstract Schoenfeld, BJ. Postexercise hypertrophic adaptations: A reexamination of the hormone hypothesis and its applicability to resistance training program design. J Strength Cond Res 27(6): 1720–1730, 2013—It has been well documented in the literature that resistance training can promote marked increases in skeletal muscle mass. Postexercise hypertrophic adaptations are mediated by a complex enzymatic cascade whereby mechanical tension is molecularly transduced into anabolic and catabolic… 

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...