Post-translational non-enzymatic modification of proteins. II. Separation of selected protein species after glycation and other carbonyl-mediated modifications.

Abstract

There are two strategies applicable to revealing non-enzymatic post-translational modifications of proteins; while assaying of the hydrolytically stable adducts was the subject of our previous communication [1], here we attempted to review separation technologies for the unfragmented modified proteins. There are a few standard procedures used for this purpose, namely Laemmli gel electrophoresis, different modes of gel permeation chromatography and boronate affinity chromatography. The latter approach makes use of the vicinal hydroxy groups present in glycated proteins. Some (but not all) arising adducts exhibit typical fluorescence which can be exploited for detection. In most cases fluorescence is measured at 370/440 nm for the so-called advanced glycation products or at 335/385 nm for the only so far well characterized glycation marker (pentosidine). Some indication exists that, e.g., synchronous fluorescence detection will probably in the future add to the selectivity and allow the distinction of the different adducts arising during non-enzymatic post-translational modifications (glycation). The proteins reviewed are serum albumin, collagen and lens proteins while glycation of hemoglobin is the subject of another review within the present volume.

Cite this paper

@article{Mikk1997PosttranslationalNM, title={Post-translational non-enzymatic modification of proteins. II. Separation of selected protein species after glycation and other carbonyl-mediated modifications.}, author={Ivan Mik{\vs}{\'i}k and Zdeněk Deyl}, journal={Journal of chromatography. B, Biomedical sciences and applications}, year={1997}, volume={699 1-2}, pages={311-45} }