Post-splenectomy and hyposplenic states

@article{Sabatino2011PostsplenectomyAH,
  title={Post-splenectomy and hyposplenic states},
  author={Antonio di Sabatino and Rita Carsetti and Gino Roberto Corazza},
  journal={The Lancet},
  year={2011},
  volume={378},
  pages={86-97}
}
The spleen is crucial in regulating immune homoeostasis through its ability to link innate and adaptive immunity and in protecting against infections. The impairment of splenic function is defined as hyposplenism, an acquired disorder caused by several haematological and immunological diseases. The term asplenia refers to the absence of the spleen, a condition that is rarely congenital and mostly post-surgical. Although hyposplenism and asplenia might predispose individuals to thromboembolic… Expand
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