• Corpus ID: 131318780

Post-fire debris flows in southeast Australia: initiation, magnitude and landscape controls

@inproceedings{Nyman2013PostfireDF,
  title={Post-fire debris flows in southeast Australia: initiation, magnitude and landscape controls},
  author={Petter Nyman},
  year={2013}
}
  • P. Nyman
  • Published 2013
  • Environmental Science
........................................................................................................................................ i Declaration ................................................................................................................................... ii Preface ..........................................................................................................................................iii Acknowledgements… 

Is aridity a high-order control on the hydro–geomorphic response of burned landscapes?

Fire can result in hydro–geomorphic changes that are spatially variable and difficult to predict. In this research note we compile 294 infiltration measurements and 10 other soil, catchment runoff

Debris‐flow‐dominated sediment transport through a channel network after wildfire

Field studies that investigate sediment transport between debris‐flow‐producing headwaters and rivers are uncommon, particularly in forested settings, where debris flows are infrequent and

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