Post-copulatory mate guarding in decorated crickets

@article{Sakaluk1991PostcopulatoryMG,
  title={Post-copulatory mate guarding in decorated crickets},
  author={S. Sakaluk},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={1991},
  volume={41},
  pages={207-216}
}
Abstract Although post-copulatory mate guarding occurs in a variety of crickets, its adaptive significance remains largely unknown. Mate guarding may function to prevent females from prematurely removing the externally attached sperm ampulla, thereby ensuring maximum insemination. This hypothesis was tested in decorated crickets, Gryllodes supplicans , by comparing ampulla retention times of females guarded by their mates with those of unguarded females. There was no difference in ampulla… Expand

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