Post-copulatory mate guarding by males of the demselfly Hetaerina vulnerata Selys (Odonata: Calopterygidae)

@article{Alcock1982PostcopulatoryMG,
  title={Post-copulatory mate guarding by males of the demselfly Hetaerina vulnerata Selys (Odonata: Calopterygidae)},
  author={John Alcock},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={1982},
  volume={30},
  pages={99-107}
}
  • J. Alcock
  • Published 1 February 1982
  • Biology
  • Animal Behaviour
The adaptive significance of non-contact mate guarding by males of the dragonfly,Nannophya pygmaea Rambur (Odonata: Libellulidae)
TLDR
InNannophya pygmaea, ovipositing females were frequently disturbed by conspecific males, and territorial and non-territorial males chased intruding males in an attempt to prevent their mates from being stolen.
Underwater oviposition in a damselfly (Odonata: Coenagrionidae) favors male vigilance, and multiple mating by females
  • O. Fincke
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    Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology
  • 2004
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It is demonstrated that males guard submerged females rather than perch sites, and are behaviorally distinct from lone males at the water, which insures that a mate lives to lay a complete egg clutch in addition to protecting a male's sperm investment.
ON THE BIOLOGY OF THE DAMSELFLY VESTAUS AMABILIS, LIEFFTINCK (ODONATA: CALOPTERYGIDAE) IN BORNEO
Abstract The habitat, territorial and reproductive behaviour of the Bornean calopterygid damselfly Vestalis amabilis, are described. Males are territorial and will remain at the same site defending a
Sperm competition ofMacrocheles muscaedomesticae (Scopoli) (Acarina: Mesostigmata: Macrochelidae), with special reference to precopulatory mate guarding behavior
TLDR
Results seem to indicate that males of M. muscaedomesticae guard the immature females in order to secure virgin individuals to mate with.
Oviposition site selection and avoidance of additional mating by females of the dragonfly,Cordulia aenea amurensis Selys (Corduliidae)
  • H. Ubukata
  • Environmental Science
    Researches on Population Ecology
  • 2006
TLDR
The influences of some environmental factors and traits possessed by a species on the adoption of these tactics or on the execution of the ‘trades’ were discussed.
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Both males and females in a population of Calopteryx maculata mated more than once in the course of a single afternoon, interpreted as an adaptation to permit a territorial male to acquire new mates even while guarding previous ones.
Reproductive Behavior and Its Relation To Territoriality in Cal Op Ter Yx Ma Cula Ta (Beauvois) (Odonata: Calopterygidae)
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It is likely that territorial behavior in Calopteryx functions primarily in obtaining and selecting mates and secondarily in reducing interference with pair formation and oviposition.
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The possible advantages to a species of internal rather than external fertilization have frequently been stressed, though one important point appears persistently to have escaped comment. In terms of
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The male of Calopteryx maculata (Beauvois) (Odonata) uses its penis not only to transfer sperm to the female but also to remove sperm deposited in the female's sperm storage organs from previous
Biology of Odonata