Post‐ice age recolonization and differentiation of Fucus serratus L. (Phaeophyceae; Fucaceae) populations in Northern Europe

@article{Coyer2003PosticeAR,
  title={Post‐ice age recolonization and differentiation of Fucus serratus L. (Phaeophyceae; Fucaceae) populations in Northern Europe},
  author={James A. Coyer and Akira F. Peters and Wytze T. Stam and Jeanine L. Olsen},
  journal={Molecular Ecology},
  year={2003},
  volume={12}
}
The seaweed Fucus serratus is hypothesized to have evolved in the North Atlantic and present populations are thought to reflect recolonization from a southern refugium since the last glacial maximum 18 000–20 000 years bp. We examined genetic structure across several spatial scales by analysing seven microsatellite loci in populations collected from 21 localities throughout the species’ range. Spatial auto‐correlation analysis of seven microsatellite loci revealed no evidence for spatial… 
The phylogeographic architecture of the fucoid seaweed Ascophyllum nodosum: an intertidal ‘marine tree’ and survivor of more than one glacial–interglacial cycle
Aim Ascophyllum nodosum (L.) Le Jolis is a dominant fucoid seaweed occurring along sheltered, rocky shores throughout the North Atlantic (but not in the Pacific), where it is a foundational species
Glacial refugia and recolonization pathways in the brown seaweed Fucus serratus
TLDR
A generalized skyline plot suggested exponential population expansion beginning in the mid‐Pleistocene with maximal growth during the Eems interglacial 128 000–67 000 years ago, implying that the last glacial maximum mainly shaped population distributions rather than demography.
RECENT VERSUS RELIC: DISCERNING THE GENETIC SIGNATURE OF FUCUS VESICULOSUS (HETEROKONTOPHYTA; PHAEOPHYCEAE) IN THE NORTHWESTERN ATLANTIC 1
TLDR
Recent colonization of the North American shore from Europe is hypothesized based upon the ubiquity of this common haplotype, which was earlier reported from Europe.
Postglacial-period and Recent Invasions Shape the Population Genetics of Botryllid Ascidians along European Atlantic Coasts
TLDR
It is suggested that in contemporary established Botryllus populations, gene diversity is affected by ecological factors, some of which can be traced directly to the last ice age, and other parameters of gene diversity are influenced by selection pressure, which might be more intense in northern regions.
GENETIC STRUCTURE IN POPULATIONS OF FUCUS VESICULOSUS (PHAEOPHYCEAE) OVER SPATIAL SCALES FROM 10 M TO 800 KM 1
TLDR
The genetic structure of populations of F. vesiculosus is examined with a hierarchical approach, and Baltic populations of summer‐ and autumn‐reproducing morphs did not separate in a cluster analysis, indicating minor, if any, barriers to gene flow between them.
Historical demography and colonization pathways of the widespread intertidal seaweed Hormosira banksii (Phaeophyceae) in southeastern Australia
TLDR
Patterns of genetic structure for Hormosira are consistent with other marine species in this region and highlight the importance of biogeographical barriers in contributing to modern genetic structure.
Molecular Studies of New Zealand Fucales: Phylogeography, Phylogeny and Taxonomy in Carpophyllum and Cystophora (Phaeophyceae)
TLDR
An explicitly historical concept of species is argued for, with species’ history included in species descriptions, for Carpophyllum Greville and Cystophora J. Agardh, exemplify the difficulties of delimiting species in brown algae.
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TLDR
Molecular data verified hybridization between the introduced F. serratus and the native F. evanescens and indicated that the Småskjaer area of the Oslofjorden in Norway was the source for the Icelandic populations and the Hafnarfjörður area of Iceland was the likely sources for the single Faroese population.
Phylogeographic analysis of the red seaweed Palmaria palmata reveals a Pleistocene marine glacial refugium in the English Channel
TLDR
It is postulate that the penultimate (Saale) glacial maximum was the main event in shaping the biogeographic history of European P. palmata populations which persisted throughout the last (Weichselian)glacial maximum in the Hurd Deep, an enigmatic trench in the English Channel.
PHYLOGEOGRAPHIC PATTERNS INDICATE TRANSATLANTIC MIGRATION FROM EUROPE TO NORTH AMERICA IN THE RED SEAWEED CHONDRUS CRISPUS (GIGARTINALES, RHODOPHYTA) 1
TLDR
The observed phylogeographic pattern of C. crispus populations is in agreement with a scenario in which severe Quaternary glaciations influenced the genetic structure of North Atlantic marine organisms with contiguous population expansion and locally restricted gene flow coupled with a transatlantic dispersal in the Late Pleistocene.
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