Possible physical and thermodynamical evidence for liquid water at the Phoenix landing site

@article{Renno2009PossiblePA,
  title={Possible physical and thermodynamical evidence for liquid water at the Phoenix landing site},
  author={Nilton De Oliveira Renno and Brent J. Bos and David C. Catling and Benton C. Clark and Line Drube and David A. Fisher and W. Goetz and S. F. Hviid and H. Uwe Keller and Jasper F. Kok and Samuel P. Kounaves and K. Leer and Mark T. Lemmon and Morten Bo Madsen and Wojciech J. Markiewicz and John R. Marshall and Christopher P. McKay and Manish Mehta and M. D. Smith and Mar{\'i}a P. Zorzano and Peter H. Smith and Carol R. Stoker and Suzanne M. M. Young},
  journal={Journal of Geophysical Research},
  year={2009},
  volume={114}
}
[1] The objective of the Phoenix mission is to determine if Mars' polar region can support life. Since liquid water is a basic ingredient for life, as we know it, an important goal of the mission is to determine if liquid water exists at the landing site. It is believed that a layer of Martian soil preserves ice by forming a barrier against high temperatures and sublimation, but that exposed ice sublimates without the formation of the liquid phase. Here we show possible independent physical and… 

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