Possible involvement of primary motor cortex in mentally simulated movement: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

@article{Roth1996PossibleIO,
  title={Possible involvement of primary motor cortex in mentally simulated movement: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.},
  author={Muriel Roth and Jean Decety and Marzia Raybaudi and Rapha{\"e}l Massarelli and C Delon-Martin and Christoph Segebarth and St{\'e}phanie Morand and Anita Gemignani and Michel D{\'e}corps and Marc Jeannerod},
  journal={Neuroreport},
  year={1996},
  volume={7 7},
  pages={
          1280-4
        }
}
The role of the primary motor cortex (M1) during mental simulation of movement is open to debate. In the present study, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) signals were measured in normal right-handed subjects during actual and mental execution of a finger-to-thumb opposition task with either the right or the left hand. There were no significant differences between the two hands with either execution or simulation. A significant involvement of contralateral M1 (30% of the activity… CONTINUE READING
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