Positron emission tomography as a research tool in the investigation of psychiatric and psychological disorders.

@article{Jones1991PositronET,
  title={Positron emission tomography as a research tool in the investigation of psychiatric and psychological disorders.},
  author={A. K. Jones and Karl J. Friston and R. J. Dolan},
  journal={Bailliere's clinical endocrinology and metabolism},
  year={1991},
  volume={5 1},
  pages={187-203}
}
The principles of positron emission tomography (PET) are described, and illustrations of how these can be applied to clinical psychiatric questions relating to schizophrenia and depression are delineated. The metabolic changes in the frontal lobes which have been described in both depression and schizophrenia and depression are reviewed and discussed. More recent PET techniques allow several serial measurements of changes in regional blood flow in response to either a pharmacological challenge… CONTINUE READING

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The principles of positron emission tomography ( PET ) are described , and illustrations of how these can be applied to clinical psychiatric questions relating to schizophrenia and depression are delineated .
The principles of positron emission tomography ( PET ) are described , and illustrations of how these can be applied to clinical psychiatric questions relating to schizophrenia and depression are delineated .
The principles of positron emission tomography ( PET ) are described , and illustrations of how these can be applied to clinical psychiatric questions relating to schizophrenia and depression are delineated .
New tracer methods of quantitating changes in in vivo concentrations of opioid receptors allow direct pharmacological access to the endogenous opioid system in the brain .
The principles of positron emission tomography ( PET ) are described , and illustrations of how these can be applied to clinical psychiatric questions relating to schizophrenia and depression are delineated .
New tracer methods of quantitating changes in in vivo concentrations of opioid receptors allow direct pharmacological access to the endogenous opioid system in the brain .
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