Positional Behavior of Black Spider Monkeys (Ateles paniscus) in French Guiana

@article{Youlatos2004PositionalBO,
  title={Positional Behavior of Black Spider Monkeys (Ateles paniscus) in French Guiana},
  author={Dionisios Youlatos},
  journal={International Journal of Primatology},
  year={2004},
  volume={23},
  pages={1071-1093}
}
  • D. Youlatos
  • Published 1 October 2002
  • Biology
  • International Journal of Primatology
Spider monkeys (Ateles) frequently use suspensory locomotion and postures, and their postcranial morphology suggests convergence with extant hominoids in canopy and food utilization. [...] Key Method In French Guiana, Ateles confined travel and feeding locomotion on small and medium-sized moderately inclined supports in the main canopy. Tail-arm brachiation and clamber were their main traveling modes, while clamber was the dominant feeding locomotor mode. Small horizontal supports were predominant during their…Expand
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