Population histories of right whales (Cetacea: Eubalaena) inferred from mitochondrial sequence diversities and divergences of their whale lice (Amphipoda: Cyamus)

@article{Kaliszewska2005PopulationHO,
  title={Population histories of right whales (Cetacea: Eubalaena) inferred from mitochondrial sequence diversities and divergences of their whale lice (Amphipoda: Cyamus)},
  author={Zofia A Kaliszewska and Jon Seger and Victoria J. Rowntree and Susan G. Barco and R. M. D. Benegas and Peter B. Best and MOIRA W. Brown and Robert L. Brownell and Alejandro Carribero and Robert G. Harcourt and Amy R. Knowlton and Kim Marshall-Tilas and Nathalie J. Patenaude and Mar{\'i}a Daniela Rivarola and Catherine M. Schaeff and Mariano Sironi and Wendy Anne Smith and Tadasu. K. Yamada},
  journal={Molecular Ecology},
  year={2005},
  volume={14}
}
Right whales carry large populations of three ‘whale lice’ (Cyamus ovalis, Cyamus gracilis, Cyamus erraticus) that have no other hosts. We used sequence variation in the mitochondrial COI gene to ask (i) whether cyamid population structures might reveal associations among right whale individuals and subpopulations, (ii) whether the divergences of the three nominally conspecific cyamid species on North Atlantic, North Pacific, and southern right whales (Eubalaena glacialis, Eubalaena japonica… 
The host-specific whale louse (Cyamus boopis) as a potential tool for interpreting humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) migratory routes
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The present data reinforces that population dynamics of humpback whales seem more complex than stable migration routes, which could have implications for both management of the species and cultural transmissions of behaviours.
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Occurrence of whale barnacles in Nerja Cave (Málaga, southern Spain): Indirect evidence of whale consumption by humans in the Upper Magdalenian
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