Population genomics of the Viking world.

@article{Margaryan2020PopulationGO,
  title={Population genomics of the Viking world.},
  author={Ashot Margaryan and Daniel John Lawson and Martin Sikora and Fernando Racimo and Simon Rasmussen and Ida Moltke and Lara M Cassidy and Emil J{\o}rsboe and Andr{\'e}s Ingason and Mikkel Winther Pedersen and Thorfinn Sand Korneliussen and Helene Wilhelmson and Magdalena M Bus and Peter de Barros Damgaard and Rui Martiniano and Gabriel Renaud and Claude Bh{\'e}rer and Jos{\'e} V{\'i}ctor Moreno-Mayar and Anna K. Fotakis and Marie Allen and Raili Allm{\"a}e and Martyna Molak and Enrico Cappellini and Gabriele Scorrano and Hugh McColl and Alexandra P. Buzhilova and Allison Fox and Anders Albrechtsen and Berit Sch{\"u}tz and Birgitte Skar and Caroline Arcini and Ceri Falys and Charlotte Hedenstierna Jonson and Dariusz Blaszczyk and Denis Valerevich Pezhemsky and Gordon Turner-Walker and Hildur Gestsd{\'o}ttir and Inge Lundstr{\o}m and Ingrid Gustin and Ingrid Mainland and I. D. Potekhina and Italo M. Muntoni and Jade Yu Cheng and Jesper Stenderup and Jilong Ma and Julie Gibson and J{\"u}ri Peets and J{\"o}rgen Gustafsson and Katrine H{\o}jholt Iversen and Linzi Simpson and Lisa Strand and Louise Loe and Maeve Sikora and Marek Florek and Maria Vretemark and Mark Redknap. and Monika Bajka and Tamara Pushkina and Morten Breinholt S{\o}vs{\o} and Natalia Grigoreva and Tom Christensen and Ole Thirup Kastholm and Otto Uldum and Pasquale Favia and Per Holck and Sabine Sten and S{\'i}mun V. Arge and Sturla Ellingv{\aa}g and Vayacheslav Moiseyev and Wiesław Bogdanowicz and Yvonne Magnusson and Ludovic Orlando and Peter Pentz and Mads Dengs{\o} Jessen and Anne Pedersen and Mark Collard and Daniel G. Bradley and Marie Louise Schjellerup J{\o}rkov and Jette Arneborg and Niels Lynnerup and Neil S. Price and M. Thomas P. Gilbert and Morten E. Allentoft and Jan Bill and S{\o}ren Michael Sindb{\ae}k and Lotte Hedeager and Kristian Kristiansen and Rasmus Nielsen and Thomas M. Werge and Eske Willerslev},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2020},
  volume={585 7825},
  pages={
          390-396
        }
}
The maritime expansion of Scandinavian populations during the Viking Age (about AD 750-1050) was a far-flung transformation in world history1,2. Here we sequenced the genomes of 442 humans from archaeological sites across Europe and Greenland (to a median depth of about 1×) to understand the global influence of this expansion. We find the Viking period involved gene flow into Scandinavia from the south and east. We observe genetic structure within Scandinavia, with diversity hotspots in the… 
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TKGWV2: an ancient DNA relatedness pipeline for ultra-low coverage whole genome shotgun data
TLDR
An updated version of a method that enables estimates of 1st and 2nd-degrees of relatedness with as little as 0.026× average coverage has the potential to enable relatedness estimation on ancient whole genome shotgun data during routine low-coverage screening, and therefore improve project management when decisions need to be made on which individuals are to be further sequenced.
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