Population genetic structure and colonization history of Bombus terrestris s.l. (Hymenoptera: Apidae) from the Canary Islands and Madeira

@article{Widmer1998PopulationGS,
  title={Population genetic structure and colonization history of Bombus terrestris s.l. (Hymenoptera: Apidae) from the Canary Islands and Madeira},
  author={A. Widmer and P. Schmid-Hempel and A. Estoup and A. Scholl},
  journal={Heredity},
  year={1998},
  volume={81},
  pages={563-572}
}
The bumble bee Bombus terrestris L. is a geographically variable species with a wide distribution in Europe, the near East, northern Africa, Mediterranean islands, the Canary Islands and Madeira. Based on morphological and coat colour pattern differences, the bumble bee populations of the Canary Islands and Madeira are currently treated as separate species, B. canariensis and B. maderensis, respectively. To analyse the phylogeographical associations of these bees with continental B. terrestris… Expand

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