Population density, social pathology, and behavioral ecology

@article{Moore2007PopulationDS,
  title={Population density, social pathology, and behavioral ecology},
  author={Jim Moore},
  journal={Primates},
  year={2007},
  volume={40},
  pages={1-22}
}
Evolutionary determinants of modular societies in colobines
TLDR
This hypothesis argues that where the pressure from nonreproductive bachelor males is unusually high, OMUs aggregate as a means of decreasing the amount of harassment and the risk of takeovers and infanticide, and modular sociality in Asian colobines may have arisen because both social benefits are substantial and ecological costs are relatively low.
Constraints on population growth of blue monkeys (Cercopithecus mitis) in Kibale National Park, Uganda
TLDR
It is concluded that blue monkeys at Ngogo experience competitive exclusion from grey-cheeked mangabeys, possibly resolving the 50-year mystery surrounding this population of blue monkeys in Uganda.
Geographic intra-specific variation in social organization is driven by population density
TLDR
Geographic variation drives the evolution of social flexibility in the metapopulation of striped mice, causing intra-specific variation in its social organization, which might also be important in other species, especially in species with a fast life history.
The role of biological and economic factors in urban population growth
This paper explores the influence of biological mechanisms in overpopulated territories on urban growth and addresses the question how biological factors correlate with economic factors, such as GDP
The Temporal Scale of Behavioural and Demographic Flexibility: Implications for Comparative Analyses and Conservation
  • K. Strier
  • Environmental Science, Psychology
  • 2018
TLDR
Longitudinal and cross-sectional data from the critically endangered northern muriqui and other primate species provide comparative insights into patterns of behavioural and demographic flexibility that can advance the understanding of primate adaptive potentials and constraints over ecological and evolutionary time.
Variation in the social organization of gorillas: Life history and socioecological perspectives
TLDR
Five ultimate causes for the variability in social organization within and among gorilla populations are reviewed: human disturbance, ecological constraints on group size, risk of infanticide, life history patterns, and population density.
Group movements in response to competitors’ calls indicate conflicts of interest between male and female grey‐cheeked mangabeys
TLDR
As suspected, grey‐cheeked mangabeys use neighbors’ long‐distance calls to maintain a spatial buffer between groups but changes in group movements indicate a conflict between male and female interests.
Primate social behavior.
  • K. Strier
  • Psychology
    American journal of physical anthropology
  • 2018
Impacts of worker density in colony-level aggression, expansion, and survival of the acacia-ant Crematogaster mimosae.
TLDR
Changes in worker density due to disturbances or inter-group battles have the potential to disrupt competitive hierarchies and create opportunities for the survival of subordinate competitors in this ant-plant system.
What does variation in primate behavior mean?
  • K. Strier
  • Biology
    American journal of physical anthropology
  • 2017
TLDR
There remains an urgent challenge of understanding intraspecific variation in a way that will facilitate the development of new predictive models to assess population resilience and extinction risks in the face of climate change and other anthropogenic influences.
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