Population attributable risks for modifiable lifestyle factors and breast cancer in New Zealand women

@article{Hayes2013PopulationAR,
  title={Population attributable risks for modifiable lifestyle factors and breast cancer in New Zealand women},
  author={James Hayes and A. Richardson and Christopher M. Frampton},
  journal={Internal Medicine Journal},
  year={2013},
  volume={43}
}
Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed invasive cancer in New Zealand women and modifiable lifestyle risk factors may contribute to this. 
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