Population Dynamics of Adult Fleas (Siphonaptera) on Hosts and in Nests of the California Vole

@inproceedings{Stark2002PopulationDO,
  title={Population Dynamics of Adult Fleas (Siphonaptera) on Hosts and in Nests of the California Vole},
  author={H. Stark},
  booktitle={Journal of medical entomology},
  year={2002}
}
  • H. Stark
  • Published in Journal of medical entomology 2002
  • Biology, Medicine
Abstract Microtus californicus (Peale, 1848) were live trapped or retrapped 887 times, and fleas were collected over a 2.5-yr period in the San Francisco Watershed and Wildlife Refuge. Also, 179 M. californicus nests were collected monthly with observations to identify the environment of fleas. The ratio of the mean number of fleas per nest to the mean number collected on voles was 4.7:1 for Malaraeus telchinus (Rothschild, 1905), 13:1 for Hystrichopsylla occidentalis linsdalei Holland, 1957, 9… Expand
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Ten taxa of mammal fleas were among 124 collection records from 12 host species, at 72 localities on the southeastern Alaska mainland in 1989 and during an extensive survey of mammals in 1992-1995 and 1997-1999, to find new fleas for Alaska. Expand
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  • Biology, Medicine
  • The Journal of parasitology
  • 2006
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The results of this study demonstrate that the index of host body infestation by fleas can be used reliably as an indicator of the entire population size. Expand
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The sex ratio of flea collected from an individual rodent did not differ significantly from the sex ratio in the entire flea population, and neither host gender, and age nor number of fleas co-occurring on a host affected this indicator. Expand
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TLDR
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TLDR
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Antennal detection of sex pheromone by female Pandemis limitata (Robinson) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) and its impact on their calling behaviour
TLDR
Electroantennographic detection was used to find female P. limitata able to perceive both of their known pheromone components, (Z)-11-tetradecenyl acetate and (Z-9-tributary of acetate), and found female antennal response was found to be 46.3% weaker than that of males. Expand
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