Polyterritorial Polygyny in the Pied Flycatcher

@article{Alatalo1990PolyterritorialPI,
  title={Polyterritorial Polygyny in the Pied Flycatcher},
  author={Rauno V. Alatalo and A. Lundberg},
  journal={Advances in The Study of Behavior},
  year={1990},
  volume={19},
  pages={1-27}
}
Publisher Summary The chapter discusses on the evolution of polyterritoriality in Ficedulu hypofeuca species. It estimates the costs and benefits to males and females, and uses the results to evaluate current alternative polygyny models. This chapter also explains that secondary females raise fewer offspring that most likely are of poorer quality than offspring of monogamous and primary females. This is probably not because the secondary females are of lower quality than other females settling… Expand
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Female-female aggression explains polyterritoriality in male pied flycatchers
Abstract Many male pied flycatchers, Ficedula hypoleuca , try to attract a second mate in a distant territory around the time their initial mate lays her clutch. In this study their success atExpand
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Nest and mate choice in the red bishop (Euplectes orix): female settlement rules
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References

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Polyterritorial Polygyny in the Pied Flycatcher: Male Deception or Female Choice?
TLDR
This view contradicts the Orians-Verner model (Verner 1964; Orians 1969) that predicts polygyny will occur in situations in which the distribution of resources is sufficiently irregular that a female mating with an already paired male on a territory ofsuperior quality has equal or better eproductive success than if she mated with an unmated male on an inferior quality. Expand
Why do pied flycatcher females mate with already-mated males?
TLDR
It is suggested that males, by being polyterritorial, deceive females into accepting polygyny; and females can be deceived since they do not have time to find out the marital status of males. Expand
The sexy son hypothesis: data from the pied flycatcher Ficedula hypoleuca
TLDR
The applicability of the sexy son hypothesis is limited since it is based on the unrealistic assumption of relatively high heritability for a character with great influence on male fitness, as illustrated by the relation between lifetime reproductive success and tarsus length. Expand
Polygyny in the pied flycatcher, Ficedula hypoleuca: a test of the deception hypothesis
TLDR
The deception hypothesis was not supported by the data, and the reduced reproductive success of secondary females may be explained by the cost of searching for a mate. Expand
On the cost of searching for a mate in female pied flycatchers Ficedula hypoleuca
TLDR
The length of the premating period was negatively correlated with female body weight and prevailing air temperature, indicating that the females were subject to an energy constraint when searching, and competition for a mate, rather than for food, may explain the spacing of males. Expand
The Conflict Between Male Polygamy and Female Monogamy: The Case of the Pied Flycatcher Ficedula hypoleuca
TLDR
It is contention that, in the "battle between the sexes," the male sex is relatively victorious in the pied flycatcher as compared with most altricial bird species which are strictly or almost strictly monogamous. Expand
Conflict or cooperation between parents in feeding nestlings in the Pied Flycatcher Ficedula hypoleuca
TLDR
The model af Houston and Davies (1985) assumes that increasing effort affects adult mortality only after the independent of the young, but in reality, adults might die before that time, and then the joint interest of both parents in staying alive at least until the independence of young, may have led to the stable "agreement" of Pied Flycatcher mates in contributing equally to the feeding af nestlings. Expand
EVOLUTION OF POLYGAMY IN THE LONG‐BILLED MARSH WREN
TLDR
It is pointed out that if sexual selection results in sexual dimorphism expressed during the period of parental care, there may be a change in average expenditure per sex with a consequent change in sex ratio, and mate preference, which in my opinion should have a profound influence on the mating system, may also have an effect on the sex ratio. Expand
HERITABILITY AND SELECTION ON TARSUS LENGTH IN THE PIED FLYCATCHER (FICEDULA HYPOLEUCA)
TLDR
A full‐sib correlation yields an estimate of the heritability twice as high as the parent‐offspring regression did, indicating that shared environment effects, which are not correlated with the tarsus length of parents, must be important. Expand
Effects of long-acting testosterone treatment on freeliving pied flycatchers, Ficedula hypoleuca, during the breeding period
TLDR
It was shown that the song of the male pied flycatcher is dependent upon androgens, and the testosterone treatment prolonged territorial behaviour, and a higher percentage of nests without a feeding male during the nestling period was found in the experimental area. Expand
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