Polynomial-Time Algorithms for Prime Factorization and Discrete Logarithms on a Quantum Computer

@article{Shor1999PolynomialTimeAF,
  title={Polynomial-Time Algorithms for Prime Factorization and Discrete Logarithms on a Quantum Computer},
  author={Peter W. Shor},
  journal={SIAM J. Comput.},
  year={1999},
  volume={26},
  pages={1484-1509}
}
  • P. Shor
  • Published 30 August 1995
  • Computer Science
  • SIAM J. Comput.
A digital computer is generally believed to be an efficient universal computing device; that is, it is believed able to simulate any physical computing device with an increase in computation time by at most a polynomial factor. [] Key Method Efficient randomized algorithms are given for these two problems on a hypothetical quantum computer. These algorithms take a number of steps polynomial in the input size, e.g., the number of digits of the integer to be factored.

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