Polymyalgia Rheumatica and Giant Cell Arteritis in Older Patients

@article{Schmidt2011PolymyalgiaRA,
  title={Polymyalgia Rheumatica and Giant Cell Arteritis in Older Patients},
  author={Jean Schmidt and Kenneth J. Warrington},
  journal={Drugs \& Aging},
  year={2011},
  volume={28},
  pages={651-666}
}
Giant cell arteritis (GCA) is an inflammatory vasculopathy that involves large- and medium-sized arteries and can cause vision loss, stroke and aneurysms. GCA occurs in people aged >50 years and is more common in women. A higher incidence of the disease is observed in populations from Northern European countries.Polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) is a periarticular inflammatory process manifesting as pain and stiffness in the neck, shoulders and pelvic girdle. PMR shares the same pattern of age and… 
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A case of biopsy-negative GCA in which PET-CT revealed evidence of extensive large-vessel vasculitis is presented, and it is shown that treatment delay can result in treatment delay, predisposing patients to a number of potentially disabling and life-threatening complications.
A concise review of significantly modified serological biomarkers in giant cell arteritis, as detected by different methods.
TLDR
The review aims to provide concise overview of published GCA studies in order to identify significantly changed serological biomarkers in GCA and compare the influences of techniques for marker evaluation, and investigate most promising markers in G CA using analyte frequency and meta-analysis.
Letter to the Editor (matters arising)
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TLDR
The best follow-up and treatment are to be determined for the patients with aortitis related to GCA as well as for patients with incomplete response to treatment.
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